School History

Vembadi Girls’ High School boasts a long history of perceptible accomplishment with rich grandeur among the schools in the Northern Province of Sri Lanka. Methodist Missionaries, who arrived from England, initiated their service here to broaden the education of the area by establishing an English School. This English School, called as The Weslyan Central School, was situated at the present Vembadi Premises. Later they felt the need to educate the girls in the Jaffna society and decided to start a school for girls, so The Boys English School (present Central College) was shifted to the adjoining premises. When we look back at the President history, there were several past principals who rendered their service to the school intensely. Please see School Timeline on the next page for more details.

Our first principal was Mrs. Peter Percival in the year 1837. The first National Principal was Ms.Mabel Thambiah. This school is a consequence of the Jaffna Tamil women who came out from their cocooned life in the past. Every year the school fabricates the cream of the crop in the society and many students cro

ss the threshold of the university to master in the education in different fields. It is also considered to be one of the leading girls’ schools in Jaffna. The principal, teachers and students strive hard to get the eminence of the school. It has educated many top people in Sri Lanka and all over the world. In the modern world, our students are spread everywhere in various designations. The 5S concepts have been introduced in our school. This 5S project is destined for the primary and the intermediate classes to teach Maths and Science effectively. A great opportunity is assured to all the girls to get the education to reach the utmost position in the society. Our school always secures the first place in its first-rate discipline, manners and education.

In the history of Vembadi, the end of 1924 saw the introduction of the school motto "Dare to do Right", chosen because it was felt that what people in Jaffna needed was the courage of their convictions, and it was necessary that the girls should develop some of that courage so that they might not be tossed about by every breath of public opinion and be held in the grip of "fear of what people will say".